Beyond the Basics

Throwing Patterns With Paddles

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Throwing Patterns With Paddles

Students learn the foot positions, body weight, and release for underhand throwing. Learn paddle use, safety, and the forehand and backhand swings with the paddle. You and your students are taken through this step-by-step tutorial that will reinforce basic skills and build a foundation for new skills.

By learning the proper positions for throwing and swinging, you'll be a better athlete and have more fun.

  1. Students will review the underhand-throwing pattern.
  2. Students will understand how to grip the paddle. The student should place his or her hand through the rope on the paddle and then twist the rope until the rope will not be able to slide off; this procedure will keep the paddle from being thrown or dropped. The student should then grip the handle with five fingernails showing.
  3. Students will understand how to perform the underhand motion with the paddle.
  4. Students will understand the forehand motion.
  5. Students will understand how to perform the backhand technique.

  1. Review the underhand-throwing pattern.

    1. Starting Position: Each student should hold the ball in one hand and extend it in front of his or her body. The opposite foot should be placed with the toes pointed toward the target and both knees should be bent. Also, the student should lean forward, with all of his or her weight placed on the opposite foot.
    2. The Swing: Each student should swing the ball down next to the leg and rock his or her body back with the ball in order to shift weight to the back leg. Then, the ball should be brought forward and weight should be placed back on the front foot.
    3. The release: The student should release the ball as it swings between his or her waist and shoulder, and the arm should follow through to the wall. If the ball rises too high, it should be released sooner. If the ball travels too low, it should be released later.
    4. Understand how to grip the paddle. The student should place his or her hand through the rope on the paddle and then twist the rope until the rope will not be able to slide off; this procedure will keep the paddle from being thrown or dropped. The student should then grip the handle with five fingernails showing.
    5. Understand how to perform the underhand motion with the paddle.

      1. Starting position: The student's opposite foot should be forward, and his or her knees should be bent. The paddle should be knee high, extended in front of the body, and be facing flat toward the target.
      2. The Swing: First, the arm should swing back from the shoulder and weight should be shifted from the front foot to the back foot. Then the paddle should swing forward as the body rocks forward and weight is placed back on the front foot. The arm should stay straight and not "break" as it follows through to the target.
      3. Practice this technique first using a 6" rubber ball and a ball wall, and then the students can "partner up," one person pitching the ball in the underhand motion, while the other tries to hit it in the underhand motion.
      4. Understand the forehand motion.

        1. Starting Position: Each student should stand sideways so that the side of his or her body is toward the target (center of the circle), and weight should be shifted to the outside foot. The paddle should be held in the hand farthest from the target, and the paddle arm should be extended to the outside portion of the circle.
        2. The swing: Swing the paddle, waist high, in front of the body and toward the target. The body weight should be shifted to the foot closest to the target. The arm should swing extended from the shoulder, without breaking, and should follow through to the target.
        3. Understand how to perform the backhand technique.

          1. Starting position: Each student should stand sideways so that the side of his or her body is toward the target. The paddle should be in the hand that is closest to the target, and weight should be shifted to the paddle foot (foot closest to the target).
          2. The Swing: Each student should swing the paddle, waist high, across and in front of his or her body. As the paddle crosses his or her, the student's weight should be shifted to the outside foot. Then, each student should swing the paddle back toward the target and shift his or her weight to the inside foot. The arm should swing from the shoulder, without breaking, and should also follow through to the target.
          3. After learning each technique, students should first practice using a 6 inch rubber ball and a ball wall. Then the students can practice with partners; one partner should pitch underhand to the other, so he or she can return the pitch with an underhand, forehand, or backhand hit. After both partners pitch and hit, they can volley the ball to each other using paddles.